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Tuesday, August 9
 

11:30am

Registration
Tuesday August 9, 2016 11:30am - 1:00pm
Grand Ballroom

1:00pm

Introduction to High Performance Computing

In this session we will discuss the importance of parallel and  high performance computing. We will by example, show the basic concepts of parallel computing. The advantages and disadvantages of parallel computing will be discussed. We will present an overview of current and future trends in HPC hardware.  We will provide a very brief overview, a comparison and contrast, of some of the paradigms of HPC , including OpenMP, Message Passing Interface (MPI), GPU programming and programming for KnightsLanding.


Speakers

Tuesday August 9, 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Theater

1:00pm

RMCMOA- Welcome and Flow-based Tools demonstration
Welcome, Introductions & Goals for the Workshop

Flow-based tools demonstration, e.g. netvizura, GlobalNOC        


Tuesday August 9, 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm
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1:00pm

The Unix Shell

Software Carpentry's mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing. This hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation (with Unix shell). Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

The course is aimed at undergraduate student researchers, graduate students, faculty, postdocs, and other researchers from RMACC. You don't need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

Participants must bring a laptop with a Mac, Linux, or Windows operating system (not a tablet, Chromebook, etc.) that they have administrative privileges on. They should have a few specific software packages installed (we will send out information ahead of time). They are also required to abide by Software Carpentry's Code of Conduct.

 

The Unix Shell

  • Files and directories
  • History and tab completion
  • Pipes and redirection
  • Looping over files
  • Creating and running shell scripts
  • Finding things

Speakers

Tuesday August 9, 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm
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2:30pm

Break
Tuesday August 9, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Grand Ballroom

3:00pm

Learn more about the new Summit Supercomputer

The Rocky Mountain region's newest supercomputer, named Summit, will be installed this summer.  Any researcher from an RMACC-affiliated institution will be eligible to use it, with preference to CU-Boulder, Colorado State, and institutions that do not have their own supercomputing resources.  We will describe Summit's overall architecture and outline the installation and availability schedule.  We will also discuss changes that might be necessary for your applications and workflow in order to best take advantage of Summit's advanced features, which include Omni-Path high-performance network interconnect and some nodes with Intel "Knights Landing" Phi processors.  

 

Target audience: Any current or prospective user of large-scale computing, and anyone interested in testing their applications on Omni-Path and Phi.


Speakers
avatar for Thomas Hauser

Thomas Hauser

Director Research Computing, University of Colorado Boulder


Tuesday August 9, 2016 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Grand Ballroom

3:00pm

Introduction to Parallel Computing

In this session we will go a bit deeper into the current paradigms of HPC.   We will look at simple examples in OpenMP, Message Passing Interface (MPI), GPU programming (Cuda and OpenAcc) and programming for KnightsLanding. We will go into additional depth on topics based on participant interest and available time.  This session can be taken with or without the 

Intro to High performance computing session. Source code for in class and more advanced  examples will be provided.  


Speakers

Tuesday August 9, 2016 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Theater

3:00pm

Introduction to Scientific Visualization

In the last few decades, there has been a tremendous explosion of research and data. Scientific visualization plays an increasingly important role in making new discoveries, gaining new and better insight and validation from these data. In this session we will cover the basic foundations of modern scientific visualization. We will discuss some of the basis principals, methods and techniques for transforming scientific data into state of the art visualizations. Topics will include data preparation, the modern graphics pipelines, visualization tools and methods as well as a brief introduction to color theory and perception. 


Speakers

Tuesday August 9, 2016 3:00pm - 4:30pm
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3:00pm

RMCMOA- Globus and PerfSONAR
​Globus update
- data management and curation

NCAR Globus RDA Environment

PerfSONAR
- Install
- Walk through test cases


Tuesday August 9, 2016 3:00pm - 4:30pm
LSC 324

3:00pm

Version Control with Git

Software Carpentry's mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing. This hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation (with Unix shell). Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

The course is aimed at undergraduate student researchers, graduate students, faculty, postdocs, and other researchers from RMACC. You don't need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

Participants must bring a laptop with a Mac, Linux, or Windows operating system (not a tablet, Chromebook, etc.) that they have administrative privileges on. They should have a few specific software packages installed (we will send out information ahead of time). They are also required to abide by Software Carpentry's Code of Conduct.

Version Control with Git
  • Creating a repository
  • Recording changes to files: add, commit, ...
  • Viewing changes: status, diff, ...
  • Ignoring files
  • Working on the web: clone, pull, push, ...
  • Resolving conflicts
  • Open licenses
  • Where to host work, and why

Speakers

Tuesday August 9, 2016 3:00pm - 4:30pm
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Wednesday, August 10
 

8:00am

Registration and Breakfast
Wednesday August 10, 2016 8:00am - 9:00am
Grand Ballroom

9:00am

Welcome
Wednesday August 10, 2016 9:00am - 9:30am
Theater

9:30am

NSF Strategies for Support of Cyberinfrastructure to Advance Research and Education

Research cyberinfrastructure for computational and data science is increasingly a key enabler to leadership in science and engineering research.  NSF is not the dominant funder of research cyberinfrastructure.    Its support of research cyberinfrastructure is determined by research priorities, strong community ties, as well as by recognizing the uniqueness of its role.   This presentation will present an updated view of recent ACI investments and directions.   It will also present recommendations from the recent National Academies’ Report on Future Directions NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure .


Speakers

Wednesday August 10, 2016 9:30am - 10:30am
Theater

10:30am

Break
Wednesday August 10, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am
Grand Ballroom

11:00am

Enabling Petascale Predictive Analytics
Growth in data volumes place unique challenges on data retrievals and subsequent analytics.  A key challenge stems from the speed differential of the memory hierarchy including disk I/O that is many orders of magnitude slower than the CPU. Challenges are also exacerbated by continually arriving data and the rates at which query evaluations need to be performed.  In this talk, we will describe how we support real time query evaluations and analytics over voluminous datasets that encompass billions of files. 


Wednesday August 10, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
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11:00am

Public data sets in the Cloud

More and more data of public interest is being generated by government and private organizations at all levels. Frequently this data is made available through custom portals operated by individual organizations and usually all one can do with the data is download and/or select a subset for downloading. Storage of public data in the Cloud offers greater opportunities for collaboration and computation against the data. This session will discuss what programs are available to support and use public datasets in the Cloud.


Speakers
avatar for Thomas Hauser

Thomas Hauser

Director Research Computing, University of Colorado Boulder


Wednesday August 10, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
Cherokee Ballroom

11:00am

RMACC Admin Meetup
Meet with other System Administrators to talk about challenges, successes, and other topics related to HPC.

Speakers

Wednesday August 10, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
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11:00am

RMCMOA- Engaging Researchers at NYSERNET
Speakers

Wednesday August 10, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
LSC 372-74

11:00am

Marketing Yourself to Employers

Everyone has skills. They get you in the door, but not necessarily get you the job. There can be 100 or more applicants per job posting, and they all have the same or better skills as you.  It’s not just about the skills, it’s how to put your best foot forward to stand out as "the one.”   In today’s extremely competitive job environment it is increasingly important for each person to create a clear, concise statement on who you are, what professional skills you offer, and why you are the best candidate for the position.    Hear from marketing and industry professionals on what employers want to know and how to prepare for the questions employers are going to ask. 


Moderators
Wednesday August 10, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
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11:00am

Aspen Systems- Cluster Management Software and Managed Services
Not all data centers have experienced HPC Systems Administrators to manage their HPC Clusters. At Aspen Systems, we are very aware of this and have a customizable Cluster Management Suite to help manage and monitor clusters. For the customers who do not have any Systems Administrators, we offer fully managed services. Find out what features are available, and how Aspen Systems can help you run your systems, even ones bought from another company.

Speakers

Wednesday August 10, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom A

11:00am

NVIDIA GPUS- The Engine of Deep Learning

Description: Deep learning is a rapidly growing segment of artificial intelligence. It is increasingly used to deliver near-human level accuracy for image classification, voice recognition, natural language processing, sentiment analysis, recommendation engines, and more. Applications areas include facial recognition, scene detection, advanced medical and pharmaceutical research, and autonomous, self-driving vehicles. This talk focuses on the role GPUs play in accelerating all aspects of deep learning and where NVIDIA technologies play a key role in academia, supercomputing and industry.


Speakers
CT

Craig Tierney

Craig Tierney is a Solutions Architect in the Worldwide Field Organization at NVIDIA. His primary roles are to support deep learning and high performance computing. He is focused on applying deep learning to weather and climate research and leveraging the power of typical HPC technologies... Read More →


Wednesday August 10, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
LSC 376-378

11:00am

Data Management

What social and technical infrastructure elements are necessary to support research data management at the campus level? How does the campus, including Research Computing, Office of the VP for Research, the CIO, and the Library, collaborate to meet current and future needs? Join panelists from Colorado State University, the University of Colorado, the Colorado School of Mines, and the University of Wyoming for a discussion of key issues and challenges in managing and preserving scholarly and scientific data at their respective institutions.



Wednesday August 10, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
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12:00pm

Lunch- sponsored by DDN Storage
Wednesday August 10, 2016 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Grand Ballroom

1:00pm

Student Poster Presentations
Wednesday August 10, 2016 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Grand Ballroom

1:30pm

Jetstream: Accessible cloud computing for the national science and engineering communities

The Jetstream cloud is a collaboration between Indiana University, TACC, the University of Arizona, and several domain-specific partners that expands the community of users who benefit from National Science Foundation investment in shared computing resources. It is an Infrastructure-as-a-Service platform comprised of two geographically isolated OpenStack+Ceph clusters, each supporting hundreds of virtual machines and data volumes. The two cloud systems are integrated via a user-friendly web application that provides a task-oriented user interface for common cloud computing operations, authentication to XSEDE via Globus, and an expressive set of web service APIs. Users are supported by expert staff drawn from the partner institutions and from the XSEDE national computing infrastructure. Jetstream enables on-demand access to interactive, user-configurable computing and analysis capability. Because Jetstream is easy to access and use, it democratizes access to cloud capabilities and technologies, and with its focus on sharing, discovery, and use of useful virtual machine images, it helps promote sharable, reproducible research in nearly any research domain. This talk will describe Jetstream in greater detail, as well as how its unique combination of hardware, software, and user engagement position it well to support the "long tail of science". 


Speakers

Wednesday August 10, 2016 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Theater

2:30pm

Break
Wednesday August 10, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Grand Ballroom

3:00pm

The challenge of optimizing memory traffic on highly-parallel heterogeneous compute nodes- a view from scientific applications
It has long been observed that the disparity between compute capability and memory bandwidth continually increases with new architecture designs.  Heterogeneous compute nodes, consisting of CPUs and GPUs, introduce additional complexities such as multiple memory systems.  Within the single unified address space of a node, there can be large differences in bandwidth.  Effective use of heterogeneous HPC machines requires algorithm designs that reduce data transfers to a minimum, and otherwise hide behind computation those that cannot be avoided.  While advanced programming models are a key part of the solution, it is clear that scientific applications will have to change as well.  Algorithms must be sought that increase arithmetic intensity and new application designs must be implemented that explicitly avoid memory transfer.  These issues are discussed for the context of a state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics algorithm, designed to simulate turbulent combustion.


Speakers

Wednesday August 10, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Cherokee Ballroom

3:00pm

Management of HPC Clusters

Representatives and system administrators from RMACC institutions will participate in a discussion and share their experiences, best practices, preferred system tools and challenges in managing large HPC clusters.


Speakers

Wednesday August 10, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
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3:00pm

Using Raspberry Pi Clusters as an Outreach Tool- Lessons Learned
Despite an interest in high-performance computing in Wyoming, there is a marked absence of resources within the state for educators and students to learn about and work with HPC. Most schools have little to no infrastructure or staff for supporting HPC related activities. The WyPi project is an ongoing outreach endeavor to introduce HPC concepts and foster skill development across Wyoming. The purpose of this talk is to describe what has been done thus far, where we plan to go in the future, and to seek input from attendees.

Speakers

Wednesday August 10, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
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3:00pm

XSEDE for Computational Research and the Campus Champion Program

Campus Champions from RMACC institutions and from the XSEDE program will lead a discussion with an overview of XSEDE resources and policies, along with what being a part of the Campus Champion program involves and how to get started.  Our regional champion program can provide information and support to schools without champions.


Moderators
Wednesday August 10, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
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3:00pm

RMCMOA- Security on your campus

What are you doing about HPN, HPC, data, security on your campus, tools, research IT environments - issues, problems, etc.


Speakers

Wednesday August 10, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
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3:00pm

Student Posters- Q and A
Come and hear more about our student poster entries, ask them questions about their work. Watch their videos.
 

Moderators
Wednesday August 10, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
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3:00pm

Intel- Everyscale
Only a few organizations will be able to truly move to Exascale, but all organizations with systems short of that, will have the same concerns about costs, flops/watt, power and cooling.  How Intel is looking at Architectures to address both Exascale and Everyscale.

Speakers
MS

Mark Seager

HPC Chief Technology Officer (Intel)


Wednesday August 10, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Ballroom A

3:00pm

Research Data Reproductibility

The rapid growth and availability of large sets of structured and unstructured data (“big data”) has created significant opportunities to discover patterns, trends, and interactions that are applicable to many research fields. A significant amount of research accessing big data is focused on human health and behavior. A number of initial reports arising from collection and query of big data were challenged by data error.  Traditionally, data error arises from a lack of suitable manpower, planning, materials, documentation collection and archiving practices, and equipment. Data error results in a lack of repeatability and reproducibility, which can have dire consequences both for the research team, and, when occurring in human research studies, potentially licensed products which don’t maintain their claims once used by the general public. Reproducibility issues are magnified when big data is used due to additional challenges pertaining to its collection, management, storage and appropriate archiving. This talk will focus both on practical and ethical issues of reproducibility for any research project, as well as topics specific to studies collecting and utilizing big data, using both historical and contemporary content. A brief discussion of regulations addressing data reproducibility will be included in the discussion. 


Speakers

Wednesday August 10, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
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4:00pm

Musings on Exabyte Scale Principal Component Analysis

Modern mathematical algorithms, when wed with high performance computing resources, allow one to treat large scale problems in Data Science.  In particular, dimensionality reduction is one of the cornerstones of data analytics, and such ideas form the foundation for many other approaches commonly used in industry and academics.  In this talk, we will describe how techniques such as low-rank matrix completion can be used to reduce the dimensionality of large scale data sets in an efficient and distributed fashion.  


Speakers

Wednesday August 10, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Cherokee Ballroom

4:00pm

Coordination of User Training and Support at RMACC Sites

Meet with staff from RMACC institutions to share information about approaches to user training, education, and managing other user support issues.  Are there coordination opportunities to share resources, training, and support provided at RMACC member institutions


Moderators
Wednesday August 10, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
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4:00pm

RMACC Site Updates
Come hear from various RMACC institutes about their work and what they are doing in the HPC arena.

Moderators
Wednesday August 10, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
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4:00pm

RMCMOA- Gathering requirements for research cyberinfrastructure: case studies

How does ESnet engage researchers
Case Studies:
- NCAR/UCAR - CMIP6 data access/analysis
- UU - MRI domain sicence and compute science at a scale
- CU-B - Engaging researchers for the design of a shared supercomputer
- NYSERNET - Incentives for University Collaboration



Wednesday August 10, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
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4:00pm

Why do scientists and engineers need HPC skills?

For the last few decades (including most of the careers of current practitioners in science and engineering) one could count on Moore’s Law to provide progressively more powerful individual machines. Therefore, if one’s code or problem didn’t run fast enough on today’s machine, one could count on substantially faster performance within a few years. Frequently one just had to wait a little while and new hardware would solve the problem for you. However, around 2010, clock speeds of individual CPUs stopped getting faster and they are not likely to get faster in the foreseeable future. The best option available today for solving problems faster and/or solving bigger problems is to put more computers on the problem in parallel. Parallel computing has been the domain of HPC for decades and there are many lessons and skills that can be learned that are now relevant to a much wider audience. Come to this session to discuss what those are and whether current training is providing the needed instruction.


Moderators
avatar for Thomas Hauser

Thomas Hauser

Director Research Computing, University of Colorado Boulder

Wednesday August 10, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
LSC 322

4:00pm

Formation Data Systems- Hyper-Scale Storage For Modern HPC Workloads
This session will cover the advantages to using distributed, software-defined storage systems to support the extreme requirements of parallel and high performance compute platforms.  This discussion will detail core software architectures that utilize the latest QoS and Flash technologies that transform industry-standard server hardware into a hyper-scale storage platform that supports even the most demanding high performance compute workloads. 

Speakers
ML

Mark Lewis

Mark Lewis is founder, Chairman and CEO of Formation Data Systems, a privately held data storage solution provider. Prior to Formation, Mark was EVP for EMC, serving in many roles including CTO, President of EMC Documentum and founder/managing director of EMC Ventures. Prior to joining... Read More →


Wednesday August 10, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Ballroom A

4:00pm

SGI- Zero Copy Architecture (ZCATM) for Accelerating Multi-Stage Workflows

In high performance computing, data sets are increasing in size and workflows are growing in complexity.  Additionally, it is becoming too costly to have copies of that data and, perhaps more importantly, too time and energy intensive to move them. Thus, the novel Zero Copy Architecture (ZCATM)  was developed, where each process in a multi-stage workflow writes data locally for performance, yet other stages can access data globally. The result is accelerated workflows with the ability to perform burst buffer operations, in-situ analytics & visualization without the need for a data copy or movement.


Speakers

Wednesday August 10, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
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4:00pm

Remote Collaborative Visualization

In today’s world we face an ever growing increase in the size and complexity of our data as well as the globalization of interactive collaboration on projects. The data often requires high performance hardware and software available only on large clusters. In addition, researchers and analysts need the ability to work interactively in a collaborative manner from each of their individual stations. Modern remote collaborative visualization systems allow for this blending of the modern workflows. In this session we will explore some of the current state of the art collaborative visualization systems, including both hardware and software solutions, and how they can help improve your workflow.



Wednesday August 10, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
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5:15pm

Reception- Sponsored by HP
Wednesday August 10, 2016 5:15pm - 7:30pm
Grand Ballroom
 
Thursday, August 11
 

7:30am

Registration and Breakfast
Thursday August 11, 2016 7:30am - 8:30am
Grand Ballroom

8:30am

Introduction to R

R is a free and open source programming language that is the most common language in statistical programming today. In this workshop we will introduce R as a language from a conceptual and practical perspective, discussing why R is so popular for data science applications, and introducing the basic elements of the language. We will cover common data structures in R, reading and writing data files, and basic plotting functionality. We will also introduce some important packages that exist in the R ecosystem that help with data processing, analysis, and visualization. 


Speakers

Thursday August 11, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am
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8:30am

Fortran 77 to Fortran 90 and Beyond

Fortran is one of the primary languages of HPC.  There are many advantages of Fortran 90, 95,`03 and `08 over Fortran 77, including: enhanced performance,portability,reliability and maintainability.  This session will primarily cover the new features up to `95 such as: Kind facility, modules, interfaces, pointers, array operations, dynamic memory allocation, function overloading, internal IO, and the forall statement.  We will “build” a program that demonstrates these new features.  We will mention additions (object oriented features)  in Fortran `03 and `08 and look at stream IO from `03 and C interoperability in more detail.  Source code will be available.



Thursday August 11, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am
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8:30am

Programming with BASH

The Linux shell is much more than just a way to enter individual commands. In this session, we'll learn to use bash's built-in programming elements, including loops, tests and conditions, variables, and functions. With the full power of the shell at your fingertips, your efficiency and productivity will skyrocket!  If you would like to follow along with the examples, please bring a laptop that a) runs Linux or Mac OSX, or b) allows you to log in to a Linux server using ssh.  Previous experience with the Linux command line would be helpful.


Speakers

Thursday August 11, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am
Cherokee Ballroom

8:30am

RMCMOA- Science Engagement and IT's support role in research

Introduction to Science Engagement- 
Overview of the process, and what will be accomplished during the session.  

Discussing the intersection between IT research environment support and research and scientific needs- 
 Overview of the items that matter from the research world (process of science, isntrumentation, collaborations) and the IT world (networks, computational hardware, storage, software, and protocols).  



Thursday August 11, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am
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8:30am

Intel Parallel Studio XE- Intel Compilers

As processors evolve, it is becoming more and more critical to both vectorize (use AVX or SIMD instructions) and thread software to realize the full performance potential of the processor. In some cases, code that is vectorized and threaded can be more than 175X faster than unthreaded / unvectorized code and about 7X faster than code that is only threaded or vectorized. And that gap is growing with every new processor generation.

 

Session 1 Intel Compliers: Boost your applications performance with Intel® C++ Compiler and Intel® Fortran Compiler for Windows* and Linux* (OSX*). The built-in OpenMP* parallel models combined with performance libraries simplify the implementation of fast, parallel code.


Thursday August 11, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am
Ballroom A

8:30am

Open Science Grid- 3 hours

During this year's RMACC High Performance Computing Symposium, the Open Science Grid User Support team is offering a session on Thursday morning to integrate your campus HPC cluster into the OSG, in real time.  What are the benefits of doing this?

 

  •  As part of the OSG ecosystem, you can support science from over 50 multi-campus virtual organizations, including for example the LIGO experiment, and thus help accelerate science across many disciplines including those prominent at your own institution.  
  • This is handy way to keep resources busy when local demand falls or when users are still scaling up to reach the available  capacity.
  • The OSG is an XSEDE service provider.  Connecting your HPC cluster to the OSG allows your institution to directly support the XSEDE science community. 
  • For NSF CC* proposals, this would allow you to demonstrate integration of your center with the national cyberinfrastructure.
  • For reporting purposes, the OSG will provide accounting statistics showing your HPC cluster contributions to the shared national cyberinfrastructure, the resulting publications, and links to science highlights.

 

Requirements are minimal and light!

 

      The requirements and pre-workshop preparation are minimal: http://bit.ly/osgrmacc.   No OSG software will need to be installed on your system for the basic connection; a gateway service dedicated to your campus will be hosted by the OSG. All that is required is a normal user account and SSH access to your login host.  You control the policy as for any user.  Many sites will offer a low priority backfill queue (evicted jobs will be rescheduled to other sites automatically if preemption is used).

 

If interested please prepare the complete this form https://goo.gl/forms/u82tRfSmW4aYHX1h1 before the start of the Symposium (the sooner the better so we can work out kinks or answer technical questions in advance).   Please send any questions to user-support@opensciencegrid.org

 


Speakers

Thursday August 11, 2016 8:30am - 12:00pm
LSC 376-378

8:30am

Programming in Python- 3 hours

Software Carpentry's mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing. This hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation (with Unix shell). Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

The course is aimed at undergraduate student researchers, graduate students, faculty, postdocs, and other researchers from RMACC. You don't need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

Participants must bring a laptop with a Mac, Linux, or Windows operating system (not a tablet, Chromebook, etc.) that they have administrative privileges on. They should have a few specific software packages installed (we will send out information ahead of time). They are also required to abide by Software Carpentry's Code of Conduct.


Programming in Python
  • Using libraries
  • Working with arrays
  • Reading and plotting data
  • Creating and using functions
  • Loops and conditionals
  • Defensive programming
  • Using Python from the command line

Speakers

Thursday August 11, 2016 8:30am - 12:00pm
LSC 386

10:00am

Break
Thursday August 11, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am
Grand Ballroom

10:30am

Data Processing with R

This course will focus on building cohesive and efficient data processing pipelines for analysis. Specific focus will be placed on handling common data processing tasks including import/export, filtering, grouping, and summarising using the dplyr family of packages (dplyr, tidyr, magrittr, etc.). This course will conclude by looking at  creating efficient visualizations with this pipeline using ggplot2. Slides and code examples of common tasks will be provided.


Speakers

Thursday August 11, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
LSC 382

10:30am

Using Jetstream
Speakers

Thursday August 11, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
Cherokee Ballroom

10:30am

RMCMOA- Gathering Network Requirements and Science Requirements

Gathering Network Requirements via Technology-
Determining technology triggers via scientific needs. Learning the roles of network, compute, and storage monitoring and reporting.  

Gathering Science Requirements via Social Engineering-
Collaboration between Technology and Science. Conducting Requirements interviews and having discussions with academic early adopters of the requirements review process.



Thursday August 11, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
LSC 372-74

10:30am

Intel Parallel Studio XE- Intel VTune Amplifier

As processors evolve, it is becoming more and more critical to both vectorize (use AVX or SIMD instructions) and thread software to realize the full performance potential of the processor. In some cases, code that is vectorized and threaded can be more than 175X faster than unthreaded / unvectorized code and about 7X faster than code that is only threaded or vectorized. And that gap is growing with every new processor generation.

Session 2 Intel VTune Amplifier: Optimize serial and parallel performance with an advanced performance and thread profiler (Intel® VTune™ Amplifier). Tune C, C++, FORTRAN, Assembly and Java* applications.


Thursday August 11, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
Ballroom A

12:00pm

Lunch
Thursday August 11, 2016 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Grand Ballroom

1:00pm

CloudLab

CloudLab is a testbed where researchers can build their own clouds, giving them control of the parts of the cloud computing stack that would be "givens" if using someone else's cloud: virtualization, storage, networking, management, etc. This enables research that seeks to transform the cloud, not just to use it as-is.

 

This tutorial will cover the major features of CloudLab, and participants will learn how to create their own instance of OpenStack, over which they have complete administrative control, inside of CloudLab.

 

This will be a hands-on tutorial, and participants should bring a laptop with either the Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox browser.


Speakers

Thursday August 11, 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm
LSC 382

1:00pm

Open MP

This course introduces the fundamentals of shared memory programming. Teaching you how to code using OpenMP, providing hands-on experience of parallel computing geared towards numerical applications.

 

Topics:

  • Introduction to OpenMP
  • Creating Threads
  • Parallel Loops
  • Synchronization
  • Memory model
  • Tasks
  • OpenMP 4.5

For both OpenMP and MPI tutorials we assume no expertise in parallel programming. It is expected that you are familiar with a compiled language like C, C++ or Fortran. These tutorials are hands-on, please bring a sufficiently recent (mutli-core) laptop so as to be able to  participate.


Speakers

Thursday August 11, 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm
LSC 324

1:00pm

Optimizing your code for Summit

Summit, the newly installed CU/CSU/RMACC supercomputer, offers several modern architectural features including multi- and many-core processors and Omni-Path high-performance network interconnect.  Getting the maximum performance from these components requires some care when developing, compiling, and running applications on Summit.  In this tutorial we will quickly cover introductory concepts such as optimization, parallelization, and vectorization.  We will also give a variety of examples of how to structure vectorization-friendly code.  Next, we'll show how to use the compiler to squeeze the most performance from your own codes and from programs you download and compile.  In addition, we'll provide some hints on optimizing communication between nodes and to the scratch storage over the Omni-Path fabric.  Finally, we'll consider the "high-throughput computing" issue for applications that are not well-suited for parallelization.


Speakers

Thursday August 11, 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Cherokee Ballroom

1:00pm

RMCMOA- Determining Trends in Case Studies

Determining Trends in Case Studies-
 Reviewing Case Study and Interview Trends. Drafting Long Term Support strategies
Dedicating personnel for the process as part of a campus CI-plan.  

 Use Cases and Examples-
 Review of serveral example case studies, and mechainsms that were used to improve the process of science.  



Thursday August 11, 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm
LSC 372-74

1:00pm

Intel Parallel Studio XE- Intel Inspector and Intel Advisor

As processors evolve, it is becoming more and more critical to both vectorize (use AVX or SIMD instructions) and thread software to realize the full performance potential of the processor. In some cases, code that is vectorized and threaded can be more than 175X faster than unthreaded / unvectorized code and about 7X faster than code that is only threaded or vectorized. And that gap is growing with every new processor generation.

Intel Inspector, find bugs before they happen with Intel® Inspector, an easy to use memory and threading debugger for C, C++ and FORTRAN applications.

Intel Advisor, find the greatest parallel performance potential and identify critical synchronization issues quickly with Intel® Advisor, a vectorization optimization and thread prototyping tool for C, C++ and Fortran applications.


Thursday August 11, 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Ballroom A

1:00pm

Learn how to Integrate neural network powered A.I. into your applications with widely used open-source frameworks and NVIDIA software
During the hands-on exercises, you will use GPUs and deep learning software in the cloud. This is an introductory course, so previous experience with deep learning and GPU programming is not required.

Speakers
RO

Ryan Olson

Ryan Olson is a Solutions Architect in the Worldwide Field Organization at NVIDIA. His primary responsibilities involve supporting deep learning and high performance computing applications. Ryan is particularly interested in scalable software design that leverages the unique capabilities... Read More →


Thursday August 11, 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm
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1:00pm

Managing Data with SQL- 3 hours

Software Carpentry's mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing. This hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation (with Unix shell). Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

The course is aimed at undergraduate student researchers, graduate students, faculty, postdocs, and other researchers from RMACC. You don't need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

Participants must bring a laptop with a Mac, Linux, or Windows operating system (not a tablet, Chromebook, etc.) that they have administrative privileges on. They should have a few specific software packages installed (we will send out information ahead of time). They are also required to abide by Software Carpentry's Code of Conduct.

  • Reading and sorting data
  • Filtering with where
  • Calculating new values on the fly
  • Handling missing values
  • Combining values using aggregation
  • Combining information from multiple tables using join
  • Creating, modifying, and deleting data
  • Programming with databases

Speakers

Thursday August 11, 2016 1:00pm - 4:30pm
LSC 386

2:30pm

Break
Thursday August 11, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Grand Ballroom

3:00pm

Jupyter Notebook

Jupyter Notebook is a web application that integrates live code, visualizations, and documentation. Through use of a familiar WYSIWYG interface on the ubiquitous web platform, Jupyter Notebook enables scientific computing for a broader community of researchers than traditional cluster computing interfaces alone; however, a typical installation of the Jupyter Notebook software is troublesome for many of the classes of user that the software is meant to support, even in the simplest case confined to a local workstation. This complication is compounded when researchers wish to use centralized remote resources, particularly when those resources are moderated by a traditional batch queueing system.

 

By deploying Jupyter Notebook with JupyterHub, University of Colorado Boulder Research Computing provides a centralized Jupyter Notebook service to simplify access to the service for the target audience. We have further tailored the system to our environment by integrating third party code, and now support Jupyter Notebooks and parallel IPython clusters dispatched directly and automatically in our HPC compute cluster environments. This trivializes access to HPC resources while providing a common interface that can be deployed in any environment.



Thursday August 11, 2016 3:00pm - 4:30pm
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3:00pm

MPI

This course introduces the fundamentals of distributed memory programming, using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard. Similar to the OpenMP tutorial, we will be using a hands-on approach.

 

Topics:

  • Introduction to MPI
  • Point to Point Communication
  • Collective Communication
  • Virtual Topologies
  • Debugging Parallel Programs
  • Hybrid (OpenMP & MPI) Programming

 

For both OpenMP and MPI tutorials we assume no expertise in parallel programming. It is expected that you are familiar with a compiled language like C, C++ or Fortran. These tutorials are hands-on, please bring a sufficiently recent (mutli-core) laptop so as to be able to  participate.


Speakers

Thursday August 11, 2016 3:00pm - 4:30pm
LSC 324

3:00pm

Reading and Writing Large Files in Parallel

As scientists and engineers focus on larger computational problems, the time spent accessing disk continues to grow. In this course, we will explore the fundamentals of using parallelization to optimize file input/output. A basic knowledge of parallel programming paradigms will be useful but is not required. 

 

This tutorial will include hands-on exercises. As such, participants should bring a multi-core laptop, or have access to a remote parallel compute environment (e.g., Janus), in order to get as much out of the tutorial as possible. Some software packages may be necessary as well; we will send out information on such packages in advance.

 

Topics to be covered include:

  • Serial vs. parallel computing
  • Parallel file systems
  • Middleware (e.g. MPI-IO)
  • High-level IO libraries (HDF5, PnetCDF)
  • Writing code to utilize parallel I/O
  • Best practices (e.g., striping)


Thursday August 11, 2016 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Cherokee Ballroom

3:00pm

RMCMOA- Benefits and Challenges of Science Engagement

Motivation, benefits, challenges, lessons learned, future planning-
 Discussing the benefits, and challenges, that come with this approach.  

Open Discussion and Hands On-
 Walking through some live examples of a review.  



Thursday August 11, 2016 3:00pm - 4:30pm
LSC 372-74

3:00pm

Intel Parallel Studio XE- Intel Libraries

As processors evolve, it is becoming more and more critical to both vectorize (use AVX or SIMD instructions) and thread software to realize the full performance potential of the processor. In some cases, code that is vectorized and threaded can be more than 175X faster than unthreaded / unvectorized code and about 7X faster than code that is only threaded or vectorized. And that gap is growing with every new processor generation.


Thursday August 11, 2016 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Ballroom A